How to Get Charities off Our Backs

I was so excited to see this article today in the Non Profit Communicator Blog: The General Public is Not Your Audience. It’s all about how, when non profits try to reach everyone, they end up reaching no one.

It’s in line with niche marketing – the idea that there’s a perfect group out there for your product, and that your marketing efforts should be targeted directly at those people. It’s the opposite of mass marketing. Marketing guru, Tad Hargrave, explains it better than I do.

The article focuses on the benefits to the non profits of narrowing their engagement efforts, but I can’t help but think about the advantages to the rest of us: the general public.

Imagine if every charity carefully selected the specific group of people who would be most likely to find their message interesting, and focused on reaching only them? Imagine if the only charity appeals that made it to you were actually relevant to who you are and what you care about?

There are two really exciting things about this scenario:

  1. You would get solicited less overall.
  2. The solicitations that came your way would likely be interesting and appropriate to you.

This really gets me going. The quantity and quality of fundraising/awareness raising appeals is the top complaint I hear from regular people. If by adopting a more targeted approach, charities could get more support, and take some of this burden off the rest of us at the same time, wouldn’t that be spectacular?

Does the charity you support take this approach? Could they? Do you do any fundraising work yourself, even as a volunteer? Do you think it would be a good idea to promote a more targeted strategy wherever you can?

This entry was posted in Archived former categories, Charity Ideology, Donor Fatigue, Savvy Giving. Bookmark the permalink.

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